Articles

Insightful book rewrites rules on football recruiting ills

By Greg A. Bedard |  GLOBE STAFF        JUNE 03, 2012

Agents seeking to represent college football players are operating under two new rules that could help curb illegal activity – but only if there is more vigilance with enforcement.

The first change was to get rid of the “junior rule,’’ which prohibited agents from talking to college juniors before their eligibility was up.

It was a rule put in place in 2007 when then-Southern Cal coach Pete Carroll (now with the Seahawks) and then-NFL Players Association executive director Gene Upshaw combined forces in an attempt to keep agents off the backs of talented underclassmen.

The rule was bad for two reasons.

First, certified and experienced advisers who could actually help players make an informed decision about whether or not to turn pro weren’t allowed to have contact.

Second, it opened the door for people in the background – like runners, who work off the ledger for agents to gain access, plus marketing agents, uncertified agents, and financial advisers – to influence players.

So the NFLPA, now with DeMaurice Smith as executive director since Upshaw’s death, wisely repealed the rule.

It is one of many possible changes to clean up the recruiting process that former agent Josh Luchs discussed in his recent book, “Illegal Procedure: A Sports Agent Comes Clean on the Dirty Business of College Football.’’

In an October 2010 cover story in Sports Illustrated, Luchs came clean about his role in paying players – a revelation that exploded across the country. Luchs also detailed his experiences for HBO’s “Real Sports.’’  To Read full Story Click Here


SPORTSMONEY

By Darren Heitner

6/01/2012 @ 8:37AM |

NFL Agents Operating Under New Rules In The Recruitment Of Prospective Clients

As of today (June 1, 2012), National Football LeaguePlayers Association (NFLPA) English: Official NFLPA Logocertified Contract Advisors (agents) will be subject to sanctions by the Association if they (1) use, (2) associate with, (3) employ or (4) enter into a business relationship with any non-NFLPA certified individual in the recruitment of prospective player-clients.  Formerly, the NFLPA permitted certified Contract Advisors to work with non-certified individuals to recruit new clientele, but under the new NFLPA regulation, that option is no longer possible.  The NFLPA has justified the amendment by stating that “persons who are certified as Contract Advisors under the Regulations are better suited to advise college juniors as to the propriety of entering the NFL after their junior season, and are subject to sanctions by the NFLPA if they do not conduct themselves inaccordance with applicable rules of the NCAA, the colleges, and the NFLPA.”  Read Full Story Here

An Agent’s Plan for Fixing College Sports

By Patrick Hruby

An interview with Josh Luchs about his new book, which outlines a plan for reforming the NCAA

Before a game between Kansas State and Syracuse University in this year’s NCAA men’s basketball tournament, Wildcats forward Jamar Samuels was suspended for accepting $200 from his old AAU coach to buy food—the latest in a seemingly endless procession of pay-for-play stories and scandals that prompted a growing number of observers to call for major reform.

Are big-time college sports broken?

If so, how can they be fixed?

The Atlantic recently spoke to former sports agent Josh Luchs, author of the new book Illegal Procedure: A Sports Agent Comes Clean on the Dirty Business of College Football about amateurism, scandal, paying players, and how to make the business of college athletics more  CLICK HERE FOR FULL STORY

 

The Great Debate

Should College Athletes Get Paid?

The Great Debate
JOSH LUCHS / AUTHOR, ILLEGAL PROCEDURE

College athletes spend just as much, or more, of their time at practice, games, and traveling as they do in class and studying. Being a college athlete is a full time job. For this, many athletes at major sports programs are rewarded with scholarship money. But many people think this is not enough.Football and basketball programs at major colleges bring in millions of dollars and coaches and athletic directors rake in healthy paychecks. Should the people in charge be sharing the wealth with the student athletes, or is a full-ride for a great education enough?

We asked some of the experts in the field what they thought.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-great-debate-sports-2012-3#ixzz1rP61a7cm

 

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Andy Staples
Andy Staples      INSIDE COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Proposal to allow athletes to get loans from agents makes senseJosh Luchs, a former agent who has admitted to paying college players, believes a system of regulated agent loans could help clean up college football.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL STORY by Andy Staples

Congressman calls NCAA ‘ruthless,’ compares it to mafia

WASHINGTON – Five days after the NCAA adopted proposals that emphasize academic performance and make Division I athletes eligible for up to a $2,000 annual stipend, critics spoke out against the NCAA.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL STORY  By Nicole Auerbach, USA TODAY

 

Former NFL Agent Josh Luchs Heads to Congress to Correct His Mistakes

Tucson Citizen – Victor Rodriguez- 10/27/11The story was about former sports agent Josh Luchs and how he provided benefits to more than 30 college football players. Luchs would give these athletes CLICK HERE FOR FULL STORY

At 8 p.m. EST on Tuesday, October 11, 2011, ESPN will premier The Dotted Line, a documentary about sports agents directed by Morgan Spurlock. ESPN provided a DVD screener of the documentary, which I had a chance to review over the weekend.

The documentary begins with Drew Rosenhaus, the most recognizable sports agent in the world, defending one of his clients.  But Rosenhaus is certainly not the focus of the show.  Instead, ESPN provides commentary from a plethora of current and former agents, NCAA personnel, and went through the recruiting process of a young, upcoming agent named Eugene Lee.  Other than a clip of former NFLPA Contract Advisor Josh Luchs taking the cameras with him to UCLA’s practice facility to show just how easy it is for agents to gain access to college athletes, I found the portions devoted to Lee and his company ETL Associates to be the best parts of the show. CLICK HERE TO READ FULL STORY

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 Josh Luchs knows a thing or two about the system of paying players. He was involved in it for many years

Problem Solver
Former agent Josh Luchs used to pay players. So when he proposes a fix, we should all listen.

 READ FULL STORY CLICK HERE

  California state Senate looks at protecting student-athletes from dishonest agents

Any fan of USC or UCLA sports knows about the dark world of agents and college athletes. A state senator from Los Angeles wants to put the clamps on agents that approach college athletes with gifts or money. That was the focus of a Thursday subcommittee hearing at the L.A. Coliseum

Full Story CLICK HERE

Rogue sports agents discussed in panel 

Full Story CLICK HERE

 

latimes.com

State lawmakers take a long look at college athletes and sports agents

Former sports agent Josh Luchs, left, with State Senator Kevin de León

       Full Story CLICK HERE

Orlando Sentinel Articles

Legislature decides against sport agent de-regulation after call from UF’s Jeremy Foley

April 30, 2011| TALLAHASSEE — University athletic programs in Florida might have dodged a bullet Saturday when House negotiators removed part of a bill that would have deregulated sports agents in the state.  Full Story: CLICK HERE

 

Colleges, cash and controversy: Former sports agent comes clean on player payments

Sports agent Josh Luchs speaks at the University of Oregon…

CLICK HERE

Football Agents Grandfathered into New NFLPA?

Opposing Views - ‎Mar 15, 2011‎

When the NFLPA last decertified in 1987, Josh Luchs was not yet an NFLPA Certified Contract Advisor. By the time the NFLPA reconstituted itself as a labor union, Luchs had clients under his belt, and was given the option to become certified, 
 
 

College Football Controversies (Related Stories)

SI.com Home - Douglas S. Looney - ‎Feb 28, 2011‎
By Josh Luchs with George Dohrmann, October 18, 2010 This man says he paid thousands of dollars to dozens of college football players. Whatever they needed — a concert ticket, a free trip, a meal — he gave them, all in violation of NCAA rules. 

Ex-agent Josh Luchs‘ revelations should spur rising tide of NCAA 

Oct 13, 2010  Ex-agent Josh Luchs‘ revelations brought the inner workings of a shady business out of the shadows. Hopefully, it spurs a rising tide of 
sports.espn.go.com/ncf/columns/story?columnist=forde_pat…Cached

 

 Former agent Josh Luchs: ‘I’m not sorry that I helped people 

Josh Luchs, a former sports agent who accounted to Sports Illustrated more than a decade of paying college football players, said Tuesday the magazine used 
aol.sportingnews.com/…/former-agent-josh-luchs-im-not-sorry-that-i-helped- peopleCached

Is Josh Luchs the NCAA’s Jose Canseco? How These Revelations Can 

Oct 14, 2010  In a recent Sports Illustrated story titled “ Confessions of an Agent ,” Josh Luchs talks about how he paid and gave illegal benefits to 
bleacherreport.com/…/491709-is-josh-luchs-the-ncaas-jose-canseco-how- these-revelations-can-help-the-ncaaCached

Agent Josh Luchs, who admitted paying players, making rounds on 

Oct 13, 2010  Agent Josh Luchs, who admitted paying players, making rounds on radio shows content.usatoday.com/communities/…/post/…josh-luchs…/1Cached

Josh Luchs: A lot of good can come of this – NCAA Football …

Agent Josh Luchs, who is featured in this week’s Sports Illustrated cover story, joined Into the Night on the Tony Bruno Show to talk about why he is now 
aol.sportingnews.com/…/josh-luchs-a-lot-of-good-can-come-of-thisCached